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GMen Win Super Bowl Behind Eli Manning's Late Dramatics - Manning's Scouting Report - Draft Insiders.com 2004 Yearbook

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Photo – QB Eli Manning - NY Giants

The GMen beat the Patriots in a thrilling Super Bowl game behind another brilliant performance by QB Eli Manning. Manning lead the Giants to their second Super Bowl title in four years and in the process won his second Super Bowl MVP award.
Manning was hot the entire game especially in the Giant’s final drive that has become his trademark over his 8 year career. He has the uncanny ability to direct a critical late drive with the club behind and the clock and limited time outs pressuring the offense. Manning went 30 of 40 for 296 yards and 1 TD with no turnovers. He is one of only 11 starting QBs to win two Super Bowl titles. Eli is only one of five NFL QBs have won two Super Bowl MVP awards, Eli, Tom Brady, Terry Bradshaw, Bart Starr and Joe Montana (three MVPs).

Eli Manning was selected #1 over in the NFL Draft 2004 by the San Diego Chargers and was traded to the Giants who selected #4 overall. The Chargers proceeded to choose QB Philip Rivers, in addition to receiving a #3 pick and a future #1 pick from the Giants.

QB Eli Manning’s Scouting Report - Draft Insiders’ Digest 2004 Yearbook

Draft Insiders.com ranked Eli Manning as the #1 QB prospect in the NFL Draft 2004 with Ben Roethlisberger #2 and Philip Rivers #3 in the best class of premier QBs since the famous 1983 draft class that featured John Elway, Dan Marino and Jim Kelly.

1. Eli Manning #10 - 6'5" 225 lbs. - Mississippi - Sp. 4.8 - Rating 95
Hindu Theory: Peyton Manning

Talented senior passer completed an outstanding career in the SEC, earning numerous honors over his final season. Eli comes from a long family of pro QBs, including his brother Peyton the current NFL MVP and father Archie a Pro-Bowl performer from the ‘70s. Eli followed his fathers’ footsteps by attending Old Miss and shattered his dad’s passing records over the course of his career. This fifth year senior will challenge for the first overall selection in the NFL Draft ’04 whether the Chargers retain the pick or trade it. He has been one of the premier players in college football this past few seasons consistently putting up big numbers against a high level of competition. Over his first three starting seasons, he has developed nicely in all aspects of play and hopes to follow in his brother’s footsteps as the first overall selection in April. He developed nicely under the tutelage of head coach David Cutcliffe who ironically coached Peyton at Tennessee during the ‘90s as offensive coordinator/QB coach. Over his five-year career at Old Miss, he made excellent progress in the finer aspects of the position, which is so critical in the development of a young passer. He is a good athlete with a strong arm, fine intangibles and good mobility to avoid the rush and run with the ball. He sets up smoothly, displaying excellent footwork and the ability to quickly read coverage. He has a fine delivery that is quick to release the ball and wastes little motion. He throws a tight spiral, combining both velocity and accuracy that allows receivers to catch the ball in stride and make plays after the catch. He is a well-developed passer who combines the athletic ability with the intangibles and maturity necessary to succeed in the NFL. He is a sturdy well-built athlete with quick feet that allow him to setup fast in three, five and seven step drops. He delivers the ball with outstanding timing and precision, displaying the ability to make the consistently sound decision and reads in coverage. His basic mechanics are very sound and he has learned to set his feet firmly before passing the ball with a good follow through. He is a fine ball handler and has learned to work the play action exceptionally well. He runs well for a QB of his size and can make a critical play as a runner, though he is not a great scrambler. He has shown both poise and courage in the pocket with the ability to hang in ‘til the final moment and allow his receiver to break open. He has developed quick decision-making to go with the athletic talent to run or throw in or outside the pocket. As a passer, he has an outstanding arm with the strength to make all the throws and he has progressed in each aspect of that game. He uses the pump fake well and shows a fast trigger that allows him to bait cover men on the first move and then lay it out on a deeper throw. He can fire the quick out, seam or slant pass, in addition to the ability to use exceptional touch to make the fade, screen and deep plays work well. He throws the fade well, giving his receiver a chance to make a play on the ball. On the deep pass, he has progressed and learned to put just the right touch on his passes to allow his receiver to run under the ball. On the slant and crossing patterns, he displays a quick release with the zip, accuracy and timing to hit receivers in stride. Though not a great athlete, he is a self-made athlete who has worked hard in all areas of play to get the most out of his fine talent. He has developed a strong work ethic, nice intangibles and instincts through experience and following the advice of his dad, brother and coaches. He has excellent pocket presence and feels backside pressure quickly with the ability to make sound decisions to minimize negative plays. He uses his quick feet to avoid the pass rush with the toughness to fight off tacklers using his good strength and mobility to move outside the pocket and make plays. He throws fairly well on the move, displaying the ability to retain his accuracy and hit the open receiver. He made great strides over his career of reading defenses and has learned to pick up secondary receivers and find the best match up. As a senior, he was very impressive, displaying a strong, live arm with the touch and accuracy to make all the important throws. He has developed the courage, leadership and poise to lead an NFL offense. With five years to develop his talent, he has matured well in areas of football instincts and overall intangibles. He combines fine athletic talent with those intangibles to make him one of the most developed and refined QB prospects of recent years.
The Numbers: He completed a terrific career with another big season that included throwing for 3341 yards on 253 completions of 410 attempts for 62% completion rate with 27 TDs and 9 interceptions. Along the way, he set several new SEC career passing records. As a junior, he threw for 3401 yards with 279 completions on 481attempts for a 58% completion rate and 21 TDs and 15 interceptions. As a sophomore, he threw for 2948 yards with 31 TDs on a 63% completion rate and 9 interceptions. As a freshman, he did not start one game and saw action in only six games with only a total of 33 thrown with just 16 completions and no TDs. Over his final three seasons, he was a model of consistency against a talented level of defensive competition.
The Skinny: Talented well-developed passer with all the skills to succeed early in his NFL career. His level of development is very high and he is the type of passer who could start as a rookie in the right setting. His ability to make the proper read consistently and get the ball to the hot receiver while under heavy pressure will help his cause to become a first year starter. He goes through his progressions very well and his ability to pick up secondary receivers should allow him to compete for the starting job immediately. He is the most likely first overall selection in April by the Chargers who have struggled mainly because of inconsistency at the QB position. They should retain this pick and add a franchise caliber passer after making poor decisions on both Ryan Leaf and Michael Vick over recent drafts. At the combine, he did not workout. He has the talent to become an NFL star, if he gets into the right situation that allows him to succeed early in his career and does not ask him to carry an offense. This guy reminds me of Peyton Manning when he stands in the pocket and makes decisions. Both were self-made athletes who spent extensive time on the other aspects of the position like film work, weight room development and understanding the system and game plan on a weekly basis.
Draft Projection: 1st Round - First Overall Pick

Frank Coyle Chat on NFL Draft 2012 Prospects At PackerChatters.com

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Our guest host tonight is Frank Coyle. Frank is a nationally known pro football scout who publishes Draft Insiders' Digest. In it's 21st season, DraftInsiders.com is a website and publication dedicated to the year round coverage of NFL and NCAA Football. Frank covers the NFL Draft and Free agency extensively with a veteran scouting staff that provides insightful information on players and team potential in the coming seasons.

Frank will answer submitted Draft questions not only about how the Packers but for all NFL Teams. Have a question now? Questions were submitted on February 1st in a Chat that night.

We are ready to take your draft questions for Frank Coyle. Note: For those that cannot make the Live Chat as many questions as you want may be submitted now preceding the start of the Live Chat tonight at 9:00pm ET, 8:00pm CT. Our Chat is 'moderated' meaning we will be putting your questions up in random so as many fans get a turn.

Welcome everyone.
DraftInsiders.com Happy to be with Packer Chatters again
Frank Coyle
www.draftinsiders.com

Welcome back Frank to PackerChatters Live Draft Chat. Frank let us know when you are ready and we will start the questions from the fans with us tonight. Tonight's Chat as usual will run approximately 1 hour. We will try and get to all the questions in this short time frame.

[Comment From BubbaOneBubbaOne: ]
Frank, TE's and RB's took advantage of Hawk and Bishop in the passing game. Which cover ILB's could TT draft in round 3 or after? BTW- a coach who was at Ohio St when Hawk was there said at the Senior Bowl that Hawk is too big, agree?

Frank
ILB is an average group. A guy who would get early consideration would be
Dont'a Hightower of Alabama in the late first round. He is NFL ready.
Middle round guys with coverage ability would be Jerry Franklin of Arkansas
He would have limitations in the Packers scheme as a regular

[Comment From Bob C.Bob C.: ]
What players improved their stock at the Senior Bowl and who's dropped? Thanks Frank.

Frank
TT has done a great job and value buying is always the wisest.
Picking #28 creates a multiple of situations that you must prepare for.
Trading up is always expensive.
BPA always wins in the long term. I think the Packers are looking at DB early and
often. TT usually stays with his value board. That's why Packers are always in the Super Bowl hunt. I also like DL and an edge rusher opposit Matthews is critical.

[Comment From packerboypackerboy: ]
What three players do you think the Packers have on their radar at 28 ? Also, can Zach Brown play ROLB in Capers D ?

Frank
I say Packers needs are CB, OLB
Zach Brown is not a great fit for the 3-4 front. He is a terrific athlete but not over 235 lbs. Edge rushers are lean this year. Packers may address secondary at #28
CBs like Gilmore, Boykin. Maybe a safety like Martin
Point being Packers secondary was suspect in 2011 Woodson is entering 15th season and Collins must prove healthy. Clubs need 6 starting DB in today's NFL game.

Comment From Bob C.
What players improved their stock at the Senior Bowl and who's dropped? Thanks Frank.

Frank
I think players like CB Brandon Boykin, Shaun Prater & Leonard Johnson helped themseleves
I think a player like LB Melvin Ingram would be a great fit in GB
He has played both up and down on the edge and makes plays. He figures in latter first round. He had an impressive Senior Bowl
Another good fit for GB would be DL Jared Crick of Nebraska. He would be a great addition at DE in this front

[Comment From MadtorkMadtork: ]
Where is the most defensive talent late in round 1? OLB, 3/4-DE or DB?

Frank
I say DB. I am not impressed with OLB ers this year for the 3-4 scheme.
It is also one of the riskiest positions in the game. I love the CB class and feel there are 6 safeties that should go in the top 100-125 that carry solid grades.
The CB class is talented and deep. I think it will be the #1 position drafted this year again and probably the most in the first round, Top 50 and top 100 selections.

[Comment From packerboypackerboy: ]
Have you heard any news on the health of Jared Crick ? If healthy I believe he could be a STUD in the Packer D. Could the Packers get him in round 2 ? THANKS

Frank
Crick had only an average final season He was nicked up
In addition, he is a tall angular lineman who is better on the outside in a
five technique spot at end in the 3-4 front. He has the versatility to kick inside for 4 man fronts as a pass rusher. He would be a great fit for the Packers
Currently, he figures to go in the late first / early 2nd round. if healthy
His NFL Combine performance is huge.

[Comment From RedtRedt: ]
Which of these guys will most likely be available with #28; Upshaw, Barron, Ingram & Perry. Also, what rounds for Shea Mclellin, j. Crick, LaMichael James & Chris Rainey, thanks.

Frank
Barron is a top 15-20 selection.
Upshaw is well respected and probably a top 20 guy.
Ingram and Perry probably go beyond top 20. I think the 3-4 clubs like Ingram best while DE Perry is best suited for weakside end in a 4-3 front.
LB Shea McClellin is a possible 3rd round selection. Best at OLB in 3-4 scheme.
Good fit in GB
Crick late first /early 2nd RB James is 2nd-3rd round according to workout and health. Chris Rainey is a 3rd day guy 4th-5th round area.

[Comment From Uncle JoshUncle Josh: ]
Should the Packers overpay for an over-30 Scott Wells or draft Peter Konz at 28(if available)?

Frank
Wells has done well for Packers. He is only 31 years old. I say they resign him.
Konz is the #1 center and figures late first /early 2nd. Teams like Ravens, Patriots and possibly Packers would be nice fits.

[Comment From bobbob: ]
Good evening. my question tonight for frank is this. given the glaring weakness at the safety position with n.collins being lost what are your thoughts on m.martin(ok st), a.allen(s.car), and h.smith(n.d.).i've seen allen a bunch and think he's a nice player. i haven't seen the other 2. do you think they can fit the packer's system and what rounds do you see them going in. thanks a lot.

Frank
Safety is a key spot in GB
Martin and Allen are more strong safeties Both hit and tackle.
Coverage is OK
Harrison Smith is a kid I like. He shows better coverage skills than most safeties
He probably goes in the 3rd round area. The safety spot is not as deep as corner and has become critical with all the nickel and dime packages. Safeties who can cover are gold.
Aaron Henry of Wisconsin is a prospect to watch especially his ability to run and his positional workout. I think this kid could surprise.

[Comment From John KayJohn Kay: ]
Frank, most of us fans focus on the physical side yet it's probably less than half the equation. TT takes into account character, football IQ, drive, etc. Which defensive players projected to go in the first few rounds will TT dismiss out of hand b/c of these issues?

Frank
I think football IQ is so critical. Players that are hungry is vital to a locker room
Things happen over the course of the season and players that can reach down and play thru problems, injuries and never lose sight of the goal are the guys you must find in the scouting process.
DE Coples had a great Senior bowl but suspect senior season
That's a red flag even though he could go in the top ten selections.
One thing to consider is that the process is ongoing.
NFL Combine will answer many questions via interviews.
DE Branch of Clemson has top talent but inconsistent motor.

[Comment From Jacob LJacob L: ]
If a ILB is BPA do you think Tedy may take one? A player that can cover will free up the Safetys to ball hawk and OLB to blitz. Hawk could be upgraded, do you agree?

Frank
Hawk is an average starter. That's why I think a player on the GB short list
is LB Dont;a Hightower of Alabama. Great fit here. Physical and an every down defender.
The BC backer Luke Kuechly is a top 15 guy.
James-Michael Johnson of Nevada is a name to remember. Good ILB for 3-4 set.

To Continue Chat Transcript Go to Next Page

Super Bowl - Patriot’s TE Aaron Hernandez - Scouting Report Draft Insiders.com 2010 Yearbook

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Patriot’s TE Aaron Hernandez - Scouting Report Draft Insiders’ 2010 Yearbook

This week we will post Draft Insiders,com Yearbook Scouting Reports of prominent players in the upcoming Super Bowl from the Giants and Patriots. Both front offices have done excellent jobs in evaluation college talent and meet for the second time in the Super Bowl in five years.

Photo - TE Aaron Hernandez - Patriots

Aaron Hernandez #81 - 6’2” 245 lbs. - Florida - Sp. 4.70 Rating 82
Hindu Theory: Owen Daniels

Mobile athletic junior tight end has been a fine starter in the Gators potent offense providing Tim Tebow with a top weapon for their high-powered attack. Aaron declared for the NFL Draft after another strong performance especially as a receiver. He displays well-developed receiving skills over his short stay with a very good understanding to the passing game and the ability to read coverage and make adjustments. He is a mobile athlete with marginal size, though well-developed receiving skills that includes hands, footwork and COD ability that will earn him early pro playing time as an H-back. He is a competitive hardworking tight end who moves well and is a very effective getting off the line and into his routes. He has natural pass catching skills that earned him consensus SEC honors over his final two seasons. He has the ability to produce clutch plays with a keen understanding of coverage and the ability to make adjustments. He has the athleticism to block on the move with the technique and agility to sustain the block the full play. As an inline performer, he fails to get a strong push at the LOS and relies on finesse to neutralize an opponent. He lacks the pop to drive a big backer off the line and may struggle early in certain tight end sets mainly as an inline performer. As a receiver, he is a very good pass catcher who made fast progress over his career. He moves well into his patterns and runs good routes with the ability to fight off the jam and get into his pattern and create separation. He has developed sound reads in coverage and gives a strong effort to get open with the ability to compete for the ball in a crowd. Over his career, he caught the ball well with fine hands, separation and nice run after the catch ability. He does well working against zones where he reads coverage quickly and settles into openings nicely. Though he is not a powerful inline blocker, he is quick off the snap and will get his hands on an opponent to wall off a defender with the toughness to sustain relying on fairly good footwork. He is a mobile player that should make the grade as a top-flight early H-back performer, but needs to add more muscle to his frame and show better use of technique to be an accomplished inline blocker and complete player.
The Numbers: Over the 2009 season, he caught 68 passes for 850 yards with 5 TDs and a 12.5 yard average while starting every game. He earned SEC honors for the second time. As a sophomore, he led the team with 34 receptions for 381 yards and 5 TDs. At the NFL Combine, he did not workout due to minor injury. He checked in at 245 lbs and over 6’2”. At Florida pro day, he ran in the high 4.5 times with one watch having him at 4.56. He also had 30 reps in the lifting. He also had good positional drills with crisp routes while showing fine hands.
The Skinny:Highly developed receiving skills and a keen understanding of the passing game. He has the ability to get open consistently to be a factor in a pro passing game. As a blocker, he is efficient and can use his mobility and good technique to make good initial contact. Good top 100 pick with highly developed physical tools to become a key role performer. He is the type with the talent to flourish in a system like the Colts, Chargers or Dolphins.
Draft Projection: 3rd-4th Round

Frank Coyle is a long time member of the FWAA and voter in College player awards - Heisman, Outland, Nagurski, Lombardi, Thorpe etc for the past 18 years. He writes College Football Mondays weekly during the season. He is a longtime scouting consultant for the Senior Bowl, the nation’s premier postseason All-star game. He does sports radio shows for ESPN, Fox Sports and Sporting News on a year round basis related to College Football especially during the postseason team and All-star Bowl time. He has worked for CBS Sports, NBC Sports, Yahoo and Rivals sports publications and web sites.

Super Bowl - NY Giants WR Hakeem Nicks - Scouting Report Draft Insiders’ 2009 Yearbook

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NY Giants WR Hakeem Nicks - Scouting Report - Draft Insiders.com 2009 Yearbook

This week we will post Draft Insiders Yearbook Scouting Reports of prominent players in the upcoming Super Bowl from the Giants and Patriots. Both front offices have done excellent jobs in evaluation college talent and meet for the second time in the Super Bowl in five years.

Photo – WR Hakeem Nicks - NY Giants

Hakeem Nicks #88 - 6’1” 210 lbs. - North Carolina - Sp. 4.50 - Rating 90
Hindu Theory: Terrell Owens

Physical athletic junior receiver combines all the skills to become a premier NFL playmaker within a short time. Hakeem is a big athletic receiver who declared this January after a strong finish to his college career. His receiving exploits over his late career made a human highlight film. He had a dominant performance in the NC bowl loss to West Virginia in the Meineke Bowl. He combines very good size with excellent hands and the speed, quickness and strength to beat a defense in a number of ways. His ability to run after the catch with the speed to break the play has enabled him to be both a deep threat and a terrific intermediate receiver. He has been the go-to receiver in the talented NC passing offense that probably gets three receivers selected in the NFL Draft ‘09. He is very good at getting off the line, combining quickness and power to fight off the jam and get into his routes easily. He is rarely forced off his pattern with the agility to drop his weight well to make crisp cuts and ability to retain his good speed. He reads coverage well and knows the situation and where the markers are to make the key first down. He works the end zone and sidelines very well, displaying outstanding body control and the leaping ability to make the acrobatic catch. He has a very big receiving radius that allows him to make the toughest catch look routine. He is very tough in jump ball situations where his height and leaping skills give him a considerable advantage whether facing single or double coverage. He closes the cornerback’s cushion quickly and can come out of his breaks with good speed. He is a big athlete who has excellent strength and toughness to fight off tacklers and break the underneath-pass for a long gain. It usually takes more than one tackler to bring him down. His fine cutting skills allow him to change directions quickly and maintain top speed despite his big frame. After the catch, he is dangerous, showing acceleration and the burst of speed to run away from defenders. He is a physical blocker who helps his team’s ground game by his presence and he can wall off and seal the edge, in addition to overpowering a defender. As a runner, he has the explosiveness to take the simple slip screen or hitch pass for a long gain, combining the fast acceleration with good long distance speed.
The Numbers: As a junior, he caught 68 passes for 1222 yards and 12 TDs for a fine 18 yard average that earned him ACC honors. As a sophomore, he caught 74 passes for 958 yards and 5 TDs while starting 11 of 12 games. During his true freshman season, he started all 11 games and made 39 catches for 660 yards and 4 TDs for an impressive 16 yard average per catch. At the NFL Combine, he checked at just under 6’1” and 212 lbs. and ran 4.51 and 4.52 times. He did a 36” VL, but pulled a hamstring and stopped the workout.
The Skinny: Young physical go-to receiver, with the AA and level of development to be a major addition to a pro offense. He has well developed receiving skills and a keen sense of coverage and openings in the secondary to get open. He has the ability to stretch the field and draw double coverage consistently that opens up opportunities for other receivers. He is reminiscent of the big receivers in the game like the Cowboys’ Terrell Owens in size, speed and running style. He is capable of fitting into any type of offense and should compete for a starting job immediately. Special playmaker with the well rounded talent to provide both a deep threat and a very tough possession receiver for the passing game. He has athletic ability to be an immediate difference maker in the right setting. Big game performer with the package to give an offense a difference maker in the passing game. The Giants, Rams and Jaguars interested in the late 1st/ early 2nd round.
Draft Projection: 1st Round

Frank Coyle is a long time member of the FWAA and voter in College player awards - Heisman, Outland, Nagurski, Lombardi, Thorpe etc for the past 18 years. He writes College Football Mondays weekly during the season. He is a longtime scouting consultant for the Senior Bowl, the nation’s premier postseason All-star game. He does sports radio shows for ESPN, Fox Sports and Sporting News on a year round basis related to College Football especially during the postseason team and All-star Bowl time. He has worked for CBS Sports, NBC Sports, Yahoo and Rivals sports publications and web sites.

Super Bowl - Patriots' TE Rob Gronkowski - Scouting Report Draft Insiders’ 2010 Yearbook

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Patriots TE Rob Gronkowski - Scouting Report Draft Insiders’ 2010 Yearbook

This week we will post Draft Insiders Yearbook Scouting Reports of prominent players in the upcoming Super Bowl from the Giants and Patriots. Both front offices have done excellent jobs in evaluation college talent and meet for the second time in the Super Bowl in five years.
Below is Rob Gronkowski’s Yearbook scouting report when we ranked him the #1 TE prospect in the nation.

Photo - TE Rob Gronkowski – New England Patriots

1. Rob Gronkowski #48- 6’6” 265 lbs. - Arizona
Sp. 4.65 / Rating 90 - Hindu Theory: Todd Heap

Huge athletically gifted junior tight end is one of the fastest rising prospects in this class despite missing the ’09 season. Rob has performed very well over his short two year starting stay in the Pac 10 where he earned conference honors both seasons. He put up some incredible numbers over that period especially as a receiver in the red zone. He presents an imposing athlete for the position with a combination of rare size and athleticism to become a complete pro performer. He is a fast developing prospect with the blocking ability, hands, speed and run after the catch ability to become a major addition to a pro offense with some further development. As a receiver, he made fast progress over his career learning the finer points of the position such as route running and reading coverage. He has incredible size with a frame over 6’6” and he actually looks thin at 265 lbs. His size and agility makes him a very difficult matchup with fine movement skills and the hands to snatch the ball. As a receiver, he shows natural talent catching the ball, releasing off the line and route running to be ready for pro starting time. Over his two seasons, he caught 16 TDs without an NFL caliber starting passer. As an inline blocker, he shows dominant talent often with the ability to handle defensive ends in single assignments and the quickness and footwork to fire out and move linebackers out of the hole. He can seal the edge very well with the long arms of a tackle to sustain and the footwork to handle counter moves. He has outstanding upside potential and the AA to be a complete NFL performer with Pro Bowl skills. He has very good speed to get into the deep seam and give an offense an excellent weapon with the rare size to cause major coverage problems. He has natural talent to succeed and the work ethic to become a special NFL player. Despite his late career injury, he has rehabbed diligently through hard work and the intangibles necessary to be a top flight NFL performer. Currently he has only touched the surface of his natural abilities with the receiving skills to become an impact weapon that defensive coordinators need to give special attention to weekly. He is a very difficult receiver to match up with and his size and reach make him almost impossible to cover in single assignments. His ability as a red zone receiver has barely been touched and his combination of size, speed and natural receiving skills gives an attack a weapon and a difference maker. He is a smooth good-looking athlete with a huge frame, very good muscle tone and definite growth potential throughout. He has big hands, well-developed upper body strength that should allow him to grade out higher as an inline blocker with further technique and strength work. His body type suggests growth potential and further upside in that role to the 270 lb+. range. As a blocker, his game film has earned him very high grades with the ability to sustain and get movement. He graded out very high, handling Pac 10 defensive ends as an underclassman. He is an agile athlete with very good functional strength and playing speed that translates well to the field and allows him to fill all the roles. He can deliver a strong hand punch with the ability to get a very good push at the POT. He retains his blocks well with the ability to move his feet and counter to secondary moves and finish well. On the 2nd level, he is a strong blocker with the agility and the reach to fit easily on linebackers. As a receiver, he can defeat the press at the line, making good use of his hands to get out into his routes with the ability to accelerate. He has sure hands and shows a big receiving radius with fine body control and the ability to get great extension to adjust to the pass. He works well in the short zones and can use his body to adjust to the ball when it is in the air. He relies on speed and power to get into the open field with the ability to break tackles.
The Numbers: He sat out the ’09 season due to an injury. As a sophomore, he started 9 of 10 games and caught 47 passes for 672 yards for a 14.3 yard average and 10 TDs which earned him first team Pac 10 honors. As a freshman, he caught 28 passes for 525 yards and 6 TDs for an impressive 18.8 yard average that earned him 1st team Pac 10. He is similar to former #1 pick Todd Heap in size, AA and big play potential. At the NFL Combine, he did not workout recovering from back surgery.
The Skinny: Big agile athlete with the talent to be a special player with development. He can be a complete player and dominant blocker within a short time and capable of becoming a huge factor in a team’s passing game. He has an awesome physical package with high production vs top competition. Top flight NFL performer in the right offense and excellent addition for the Ravens, Browns or Saints. Prospect that would have been a top 15 pick if healthy and played in ’09. Marginal top 40 prospect and big time talent who is a player you want to have going forward.
Draft Projection: 1st-2nd Round

Super Bowl XLVI - Giants' DE Jason Pierre-Paul - Scouting Report - Draft Insiders’ 2010 Yearbook

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NY Giants DE Jason Pierre-Paul - Scouting Report Draft Insiders’ 2010 Yearbook

This week we will post Draft Insiders.com Yearbook Scouting Reports of prominent players in the upcoming Super Bowl between the Giants and Patriots. Both front offices have done excellent jobs in evaluation college talent and meet for the second time in the Super Bowl in five years.

Draft Insiders.com 2012 Yearbook - 300 Scouting Reports

Photo - DE Jason Pierre-Paul - NY Giants

1. Jason Pierre-Paul #90 - 6’5” 270 lbs. - South Florida - Sp. 4.70 Rating 92 - Hindu Theory: Jevon Kearse
Freakish athletic junior defender declared for the NFL Draft after only one season at the D1 level. Jason is one of the best athletes in this class and a rare physical specimen who runs very well and has the growth potential to get bigger. He is a big angular athlete who comes in at over 265 lbs. with the frame to carry over 270 lb. He has very long arms and the footwork of a linebacker with the speed to go sideline to sideline. He usually plays with good leverage and has the functional strength that enabled him to play several positions mainly on the strongside end position. His best pro position will initially be the weakside in the 4-3 set. He has good functional strength and uses his long arms to hold up at the point of attack well with the frame to get bigger and add muscle. He possesses the quickness to move down the line and pursue from the backside and projects to end and an early every down end in either a 4-3 or 3-4 set. He is quick on the snap with the size and AA to become an every down defender fairly early in his career. When he times the snap well, he can penetrate quickly into the backfield with the ability to close on the QB. He uses his long arms well to keep blockers off and has the ability with the power to separate and flatten out to the passer. He can hold the point of attack fairly well with the ability to locate the ball and stay alive on the play. He is still a very raw prospect after a one year college career, but a prospect with an incredible physical skill set for the NFL game. He can win late on the down to get to the passer or ball carrier. He moves down the line well and stays clean using his long arms to keep blocks away from his body. For a tall angular prospect, he has very good COD skills with the ability to recover easily. He can make tackles outside the box and pursues well to the ball carrier. He needs to further develop his hand usage and more pass rush moves to fully realize his blue chip talent, though he uses his strength well for a raw prospect. He needs overall technique work especially with his hands to show a more powerful punch. At times, he comes off the ball high that provides a big target for blockers. When he plays with leverage and a low pad level, he is very difficult to contain. He needs to get better use of his long reach to deflect more passes at the LOS and it is an essential part of upper body strength and technique development that is critical for him to play up to his athleticism. As a junior, he started only 7 games and posted 45 tackles with 16.5 TFL, 6.5 sacks, 2 FF and 3 PBU that earned him first team Big East honors. He played at two different JC colleges during the ’08 and ’07 seasons. At the NFL Combine, he ran 4.78 time, a 30.5” VJ, 9’7” BJ and did 19 reps. He can be an impact disruptive, big playmaker with great size and upside potential over a short time. He has developed a very good rip move to get past tackles with regularity, but needs development on his swim maneuver and additional move to have a complete game. He needs to learn more counter moves to combat double-teams and make plays when his initial move is contained. He is a bigger version of defender Jevon Kearse in speed, body type, AA and versatility to play end or up in both pro fronts. He may be similar to former #1 pick Jamaal Anderson in body type and LOD. This is a rare athlete with the talent to be a huge playmaker in a 4-3 set, though he is still developing and learning the game. Excellent top 20 prospect with starting talent once he settles into a scheme and refines his game. Blue chip developing prospect with great upside potential after further development.
Draft Projection: 1st Round

Senior Bowl 2012 - North Tops South Behind Isaiah Pead's Strong All-Purpose Performance

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North Tops South Behind Isaiah Pead's Strong Performance - Senior Bowl 2012

Photo - RB Isaiah Pead - Cincinnati

University of Cincinnati running back Isaiah Pead was named the Most Valuable Player of the 2012 Senior Bowl, Saturday after totaling 129 all-purpose yards.

“A win caps off the week," Pead said. "You want to go in and practice hard, interview well and meet fans, but going away with a loss – as a competitor – I wouldn’t like that. We’re all out here competing and for the North side to come in and get a win caps off everything. I got everything I wanted out of this week. I got good work done at practice and I got a win for this game."

It was a record-setting day for the reigning Big East Conference Offensive Player of the Year. Pead surpassed J.D. Hill of Arizona State as the Senior Bowl’s all-time leader in punt return yardage with 98 on the day. The previous record of 73 had stood since 1971. He also added 31 rushing yards. Pead raised a few eveybrows when he measured in at just under 5'10" and 193 lbs. at the Monday morning weighti-in. He played at over 200 lbs over the 2011 season, but he was noticeably quicker at the Senior Bowl practices and during the game. He also showed big play ability as a punt returner after only marginal talent in that role as a collegian.

Pead adds to his list of accolades which include: 2011 Big East Conference Offensive Player of the Year, First-Team All-Big East running back and 2011 Liberty Bowl MVP. He led the conference with 1,259 rushing yards and 12 rushing TDs.

Joining Pead in the post-game awards ceremony was his teammate this week, Utah St linebacker Bobby Wagner. Wagner was named the Most Outstanding Player on the North after leading the squad with seven total tackles, including one tackle for loss, one interception and one pass breakup. “It’s a pleasure. Just to be out here with everybody and to be looked at as one of the best players on the field, it’s a great thing for a small school guy,” Wagner said.

Despite the North’s victory, the South did enjoy some highlights Saturday as Joe Adams earned Most Outstanding Player of the South squad with 133 receiving yards on eight catches. “It feels good because there are so many great players on the South team and to be chosen as a standout is definitely a blessing only from God,” Adams said.

It was Adams’ fumble however that led to the game’s first points, a 27-yard field goal by Purdue’s Carson Wiggs. The second quarter belonged to the North as they outscored their opponent 10-3, thanks to an 8-yard scoring strike from Wisconsin’s Russell Wilson to Cal’s Marvin Jones and another Wiggs field goal—this time from 32 yards out. Bullock added his second field goal of the day in the second quarter too, but the South went into the locker room down 13-6.

Michigan St QB Kirk Cousins continued the North’s offensive success in the second half, hitting Arizona St receiver Gerell Robinson over the middle for a 41-yard touchdown to give the North a 20-6 lead. The South appeared to have life in the early going of the fourth quarter on Arizona QBNick Foles’ 20-yard touchdown toss to his former teammate in Tucson, Juron Criner, but Wiggs’ third field goal of the day—a 28-yarder—was all the North needed to hang on for the win.

The South still leads the all-time series with the North 30-27-3. The win improved the Minnesota Vikings’ coaching staff to 2-0 all-time in Senior Bowls, while the Washington Redskins fell to 3-4.

Frank Coyle is a long time member of the FWAA and voter in College player awards - Heisman, Outland, Nagurski, Lombardi, Thorpe etc for the past 18 years. He writes College Football Mondays weekly during the season. He is a longtime scouting consultant for the Senior Bowl, the nation’s premier postseason All-star game. He does sports radio shows for ESPN, Fox Sports and Sporting News on a year round basis related to College Football especially during the postseason team and All-star Bowl time. He has worked for CBS Sports, NBC Sports, Yahoo and Rivals sports publications and web sites.

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